Boothe's 4202 Blog

How the Internet and Technology is changing Editing

On high alert

with one comment

Case Study 5

While reporting on a beat, sometimes great stories can slip through the cracks. A journalist can get so focused and narrow-minded in his or her approach to idea generation that interesting and fun opportunities can easily go unnoticed.

Google Alerts is a great tool to help reporters rein in the pertinent and fresh information about a topic or person they’re covering. It not only provides updates about what other journalists are reporting about, but can also give a glimpse into any trending movements or stories brewing on the Web.

Typically, I’ve always used a combination of Twitter and regular Google searches to find story ideas in this way, but the “Alert” system seems like it can streamline the process a little bit.

When covering Gators sports, there’s always a heightened anticipation for breaking news when an athlete gets in trouble, because, frequently, the University Athletic Association will try to slip in a second, unrelated announcement about another athlete on the same day.

This is of course done to protect the second athlete that’s already gone through the news cycle for a previous incident.

Google Alerts would have been invaluable on Sept. 9, 2011 when UF football coach Will Muschamp announced Sharrif Floyd would be suspended for two games due to NCAA violations. On the very same day, the Florida basketball team also released that Erik Murphy was reinstated after being arrested in April.

 

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Written by jboothe

February 15, 2012 at 6:06 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

One Response

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  1. Good re Rubric – could use a bit more aggregation
    Needs an SEO friendly headline

    Ronald R. Rodgers

    February 15, 2012 at 7:15 pm


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